Monday, May 23, 2016











Angelina Jolie Pitt, the Oscar-winning actress and special envoy for the United Nations refugee agency, has taken on a new role: university professor.
Ms. Jolie Pitt will join the London School of Economics’ Center for Women, Peace and Security as one of four visiting professors in a new master’s program that starts taking applicants in the fall, according to a statement released on Monday by the university, one of Britain’s most renowned academic institutions. Ms. Jolie’s work there will include delivering guest lectures and taking part in workshops as a “visiting professor in practice.”
Ms. Jolie Pitt was appointed along with William Hague, with whom she founded the Preventing Sexual Violence in Conflict Initiative in 2012, when Mr. Hague was the British foreign secretary.
“I am very encouraged by the creation of this master’s program,” Ms. Jolie Pitt said in the statement. “I hope other academic institutions will follow this example, as it is vital that we broaden the discussion on how to advance women’s rights and end impunity for crimes that disproportionately affect women, such as sexual violence in conflict.”
Ms. Jolie Pitt, who is married to the actor Brad Pitt and has six children, said she was looking forward to sharing her experiences working with governments and the United Nations. She has been involved in humanitarian work with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees for more than a decade, taking on some of the most difficult issues related to conflict, refugees, women and sexual violence, as a goodwill ambassador and a special envoy.
Her duties have been interspersed with her acting roles in films like “Wanted,” “Salt,” “Maleficent” and “Kung Fu Panda,” among others, and her directing work in “By the Sea,” “Unbroken” and “In the Land of Blood and Honey.” She won an Academy Award for best supporting actress for “Girl, Interrupted” (1999). Her activities have fostered a surreal dichotomy in her public persona, as she is photographed on red carpets and in refugee camps.

In an Op-Ed article in The New York Times last year, Ms. Jolie Pitt described a visit to a refugee camp in the Dohuk Province of Iraq. “For many years I have visited camps, and every time, I sit in a tent and hear stories. I try my best to give support,” she wrote. “On this trip I was speechless.
“What do you say to a mother with tears streaming down her face who says her daughter is in the hands of the Islamic State, or ISIS, and that she wishes she were there, too?”
She has recently waded into the global migrant crisis, saying in London last week that she has been “very disheartened” by the response of the United States and that she feared countries would adopt increasingly isolationist policies, The Associated Press reported. She said worries about uncontrolled immigration had given a “false air of legitimacy to those who promote politics of fear and separation.”
In its statement on Monday, the London School of Economics gave no details about Ms. Jolie’s specific teaching duties or how often she would be on campus. It said the new master’s program included courses titled “Women, Peace and Security,” “Gender and Militarization,” and “Gender and Human Rights.” Students will conduct research on preventing sexual violence in conflicts and on women, peace and security.
The other two visiting professors were Jane Connors, an Amnesty International advocacy director; and Madeleine Rees, the secretary general of the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom.
Critics of some of the summit meetings organized by the Preventing Sexual Violence in Conflict Initiative have said they cost more to conduct than Britain’s government commits in spending to prosecute rape in conflict zones, The Guardian reported in 2015.
When she was named a goodwill ambassador for UNHCR in 2001, Ms. Jolie said she wanted to get involved because it was impossible to ignore the fact that millions of people were suffering worldwide.
“I honestly want to help,” she said. “I don’t believe I feel differently from other people. I think we all want justice and equality, a chance for a life with meaning.”









05/23/2016 AT 10:10 AM EDT
Angelina Jolie Pitt is taking her passion for women's rights and gender equality to the classroom.

The actress, 40, is set to join the London School of Economics as a visiting professor for the new masters course on women, peace and security for the 2016-2017 school year.

As a visiting professor, Jolie Pitt will deliver guest lectures, participate in workshop and public events, and continue research on projects.
"I am very encouraged by the creation of this master's programme. I hope other academic institutions will follow this example, as it is vital that we broaden the discussion on how to advance women's rights and end impunity for crimes that disproportionately affect women, such as sexual violence in conflict," Jolie Pitt said in a statement. "I am looking forward to teaching and to learning from the students as well as to sharing my own experiences of working alongside governments and the United Nations."

The course, which is the first of its kind internationally, was launched last year by Jolie Pitt and Britain's former foreign secretary, William Hauge – who will also serve as a visiting professor.

The Georgetown Institute for Women, Peace and Security Ambassador Melanne Verveer said they, too, are looking forward to bringing the program to the stateside campus.

"I was pleased to meet with Angelina Jolie during my recent trip to London on ways we at Georgetown University can continue the collaboration between our sister programs on both sides of the Atlantic," said Verveer. "We look forward to welcoming Angelina and former foreign secretary Hague to Georgetown in the future."





LSE Centre for Women, Peace and Security appoints New Visiting Professors in Practice

Jane Connors, Lord Hague, Angelina Jolie Pitt and Madeleine Rees to contribute to new MSc programme in Women, Peace and Security, the first of its kind internationally
 
LSE has announced the appointment of four new Visiting Professors in Practice.



Jane Connors, Director of International Advocacy at Amnesty International Geneva, The Rt Hon The Lord William Hague, former UK Foreign Secretary, Angelina Jolie Pitt DCMG, UNHCR Special Envoy, and Madeleine Rees OBE, Secretary General of the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom, will be joining the team of the Centre for Women, Peace and Security. 

They join other LSE Fellows, scholars, activists and practitioners dedicated to developing strategies to promote gender equality and enhance women’s economic, social and political participation and security.

The Visiting Professors play an active part in the Centre, delivering guest lectures to students, participating in expert workshops and public events, and undertaking their own work.

From Autumn 2016, students will be able to apply to take the new one–year MSc in Women, Peace and Security, which will include courses on 'Women, Peace and Security', 'Gender and Militarisation' and 'Gender and Human Rights'. As part of the programme, students will conduct independent research, each student examining an unexplored area within the fields of preventing sexual violence in conflict and women, peace and security.

Following his appointment, Lord Hague said: "I am delighted to become a visiting professor at the LSE with Angelina Jolie Pitt, Jane Connors and Madeleine Rees. This course will help underpin our work in preventing sexual violence in conflict, developing expertise and research to assist us in tackling the culture of impunity. I look forward to working with the LSE students and my fellow visiting professors."

Ms Angelina Jolie Pitt said: “I am very encouraged by the creation of this master’s programme. I hope other academic institutions will follow this example, as it is vital that we broaden the discussion on how to advance women’s rights and end impunity for crimes that disproportionately affect women, such as sexual violence in conflict. I am looking forward to teaching and to learning from the students as well as to sharing my own experiences of working alongside governments and the United Nations”.

Professor Christine Chinkin, Director of the Centre for Women, Peace and Security said: “Bringing practitioners, policy makers and activists together with scholars is essential in advancing knowledge and influencing global and local policy-making. I am delighted to welcome these four leaders in their respective fields to the Centre for Women, Peace and Security and look forward to their active involvement in our innovative educational programmes.”   

Notes:
The Centre for Women, Peace and Security is a leading academic space for scholars, practitioners, activists, policy-makers and students to develop strategies to promote justice, human rights and participation for women in conflict-affected situations around the world.

The Centre aims to promote gender equality and enhance women’s economic, social and political participation and security.

The Centre was launched in February 2015 by The Lord Hague and Ms Jolie Pitt in their capacities as co-founders of the Preventing Sexual Violence in Conflict Initiative (PSVI).

The Centre is led by Professor Christine Chinkin FBA, an expert on international and human rights law, who recently served as specialist advisor to the House of Lords Select Committee on Sexual Violence in Conflict.

By joining the LSE Centre for Women, Peace and Security, the four Visiting Professors will provide students with the opportunity to directly learn from their experiences working on women’s rights issues.

The Preventing Sexual Violence Initiative was co-founded in 2012 by then Foreign Secretary William Hague, and the Special Envoy of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, Angelina Jolie Pitt.  The aim of the campaign is to raise awareness, rally global action, promote greater international coherence and increase the political will and capacity of states to do more to address the culture of impunity that exists for these crimes, to increase the number of perpetrators held to account and to ensure better support for survivors.   

LSE confers the title of Visiting Professor in Practice on persons who have appropriate distinction within their area of (non-academic) practice. It includes individuals who have achieved prominence in public service, or who have attained distinction in their profession and through their practical experience. Visiting Professors in the Centre for Women, Peace and Security participate in the educational activities of the Centre. Visiting Professorships in the Centre for Women, Peace and Security are unpaid.

Monday 23 May 2016













She met her husband Brad Pitt while playing an assassin, and won an Oscar for her portrayal of a sociopathic patient in a mental hospital, but Angelina Jolie’s latest role may be her most surprising yet.
The Hollywood actor and director has been appointed a visiting professor at the London School of Economics, teaching a course on the impact of war on women.
From 2017, Jolie will join the former foreign secretary William Hague as a “professor in practice”, the university announced on Monday, as part of a new MSc course on women, peace and security, which LSE says is the first of its kind in the world.
The course, it says, is intended to “[develop] strategies to promote gender equality and enhance women’s economic, social and political participation and security”, with visiting professors playing an active part in giving lectures, participating in workshops and undertaking their own research.
Jolie, who became a UNHCR goodwill ambassador in 2001 and is now a special envoy, said she was very encouraged by the creation of the course, and hoped other universities would follow suit. “It is vital we broaden the discussion on how to advance women’s rights and end impunity for crimes that disproportionately affect women, such as sexual violence in conflict.
“I am looking forward to teaching and to learning from the students, as well as to sharing my own experiences of working alongside governments and the United Nations.”
The one-year course, for which students can apply from this autumn, will run from the beginning of the 2017 academic year. An LSE spokeswoman said Jolie and Lord Hague would teach at least once a year for the period of their fellowship, “as often as their schedules, and their commitment as agreed with the centre director, will allow”.
Visiting professors in practice was a title given to people “who have appropriate distinction within their area of (non-academic) practice”, the university said in a statement. “It includes individuals who have achieved prominence in public service, or who have attained distinction in their profession and through their practical experience.” The role is unpaid.
Also appointed as visiting professors in practice are Jane Connors, director of international advocacy at Amnesty International Geneva, and Madeleine Rees, secretary general of the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom.
Jolie and Hague have been working together since 2012 on the issue of preventing sexual violence in conflict, jointly chairing a global summit on the subject two years later, the largest ever international gathering on the subject. They were both present last year at the launch of the LSE’s Centre for Women, Peace and Security.
A British parliamentary report published last month found that the UK-led initiative arising from the global summit was at risk of collapse without the personal leadership of Hague, who stood down as an MP at last year’s election and is now a peer.
The Lords select committee inquiry into the Foreign Office found the government has no five-year plan to implement its sexual violence in conflict initiative, no coherent list of the countries being prioritised and no adequate means for diplomats to measure whether pledges made are being implemented.










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