Thursday, February 12, 2015



Video: Tina Brown interviews Amy Pascal





NEW YORK (AP) — In her first interview since her exit as co-chairman of Sony Pictures, Amy Pascal opened up about her departure and acknowledged it wasn't voluntary.
Speaking to journalist Tina Brown at the Women in the World conference Wednesday night in San Francisco, Pascal joked, "All the women here are doing incredible things in this world. All I did was get fired."
After a long reign as the head of Sony Pictures, the studio last week announced Pascal was stepping down and would start a new production venture at Sony. In her new role as producer, she has already inherited several of the studio's biggest upcoming projects, including Sony's next Spider-man film, to be made in partnership with Marvel Studios.
"I'm 56," she said at the summit. "It's not exactly the time that you want to start all over again. But it's kind of great and I have to and it's going to be a new adventure for me."
Pascal also spoke candidly about the trauma of the hacking attack that preceded her departure. When the extent of the damage was still unraveling and personal information was found to be stolen, Pascal said "everybody was really scared."
"But nagging in the back of my mind, and I kept calling them, like, 'They don't have our emails, right? Tell me they don't have our emails.' 'No, no no,'" recalled Pascal. "Well, then they did. That was a bad moment."
Pascal came under fire, in particular, for emails with producer Scott Rudin in which the two joked about President Barack Obama's presumed taste in movies. Other emails revealed a furious Rudin calling Angelina Jolie names ("the first person I talked to was Angie after that email," said Pascal) and showed her tussling with the powerful producer ("We've been having an ongoing fight since the moment we met," she said of Rudin).
"Everyone understood because we all live in this weird thing together called Hollywood," said Pascal. "If we all actually were nice, it wouldn't work."
Brown founded the Women in the World conference five years ago to bring together women leaders to share stories and advice. Long considered the top female executive in Hollywood, Pascal was known for, among other things, supporting female filmmakers. Speaking to Brown, she said much still needed to change.
"The most important thing we can do in our business is make movies with female protagonists and movies with female villains and movies where the plot of the movie is about them," said Pascal. "The worst thing you can do is be on the sidelines."
Pascal was also entertainingly frank about the inner-workings of the movie business. She called hypersensitive actors "bottomless pits of need."
Said Pascal: "You've never seen anything like it."







variety

Amy Pascal Talks Getting ‘Fired,’ Sony Hack and Angelina Jolie Emails in Candid Interview



Six days after stepping down as co-chairman of Sony Pictures Entertainment, Amy Pascal broke her silence on Wednesday at the Women in the World conference in San Francisco during a candid interview with journalist Tina Brown.
“All the women here are doing incredible things in this world. All I did was get fired,” she said, according to the Recode site.
Among the topics discussed were the hacked email exchanges between herself and producer Scott Rudin, the “The Interview’s” bad reviews, and the pervasive gender gap in Hollywood.
Pascal recounted the moment in November when she realized that her emails at Sony would be exposed.
“I ran this company and I had to worry about everybody who was really scared…People were really scared…But nagging in the back of my mind, I kept calling (the IT department) and being like, ‘They don’t have our emails, tell me they don’t have our emails,’” she said. “But then they did. That was a bad moment. And you know what you write in emails.”
Right off the bat, Brown asked Pascal about the racial emails about President Obama, causing the 56 year-old exec shook her head.
“It was horrible. That was horrible,” Pascal said. “As a woman, what I did was control how everybody felt about themselves and about me…and there was this horrible moment when I realized there was absolutely nothing I could do about whether I’d hurt people, whether I’d betrayed people.”

Pascal also said, “There is nothing you can do. You can’t say anything. You can’t explain anything. It’s just there.”
As for her exchanges with Rudin on Jolie, whom he called a “minimally talented spoiled brat,” she said:"The first person I talked to was Angie after that email,"
“Angie didn’t care.”
“Everybody understood because we all live in this weird thing called Hollywood,” she said. “If we were all actually were nice, it wouldn’t work.”
When asked about underpaying Jennifer Lawrence in “American Hustle,” Pascal scoffed.
“I’ve paid (Jennifer Lawrence) a lot more money since then, I promise you … Here’s the problem: I run a business. People want to work for less money, I pay them less money…Women shouldn’t be so grateful. Know what you’re worth. Walk away.”
Brown later said that “The Interview” was a pretty bad movie, to which Pascal replied, “You don’t get to choose what you stand up for.”
This past week, Sony Pictures Entertainment announced a partnership to make new Spider-Man movies with Marvel Studios, which Pascal will produce as part of her new studio deal with Sony.
“The worst thing you can do is be on the sideline,” she said.
The studio also recently announced an all-female “Ghostbusters” reboot with Kristen Wiig and Melissa McCarthy.
“It’s about time we have a female action series,” Pascal declared.
As for the most important thing she learned from the hacked emails? “Say exactly what you think directly to people all the time,” she said. “In the moment, the first time.”
When Brown countered that Hollywood stars were sensitive than most people, Pascal snickered.
“They’re bottomless pits of need. You’ve never seen anything like it,” she said. Then added sarcastically: “They are so great. They’re this magical thing that no one else can be. They’re filled with the need to be loved … but that’s because they’re magical.”
The executive also had harsh words for the press when asked if she was surprised about the reaction to her emails.
“I’m not supposed to say anything about that,” she said. “But I will say that I was. People found reasons that going through my trash and printing it was an ok thing to do. They found a way to justify that. And they have to live with that.”





re/code

Hacked Hollywood Mogul Amy Pascal on Sony Attack: “All I Did Was Get Fired”



Amy Pascal broke her silence today at the Women in the World conference at the St. Regis Hotel in downtown San Francisco, in an onstage interview with journalist Tina Brown.
“All the women here are doing incredible things in this world. All I did was get fired,” said the departing Sony Pictures Entertainment co-chairperson, settling in for a free-flowing conversation with Brown. “Everyone knows everything about me. What am I doing here?”
Brown answered that for her.
“None of us can imagine …” Brown said.
“No, you cannot,” Pascal said.
Pascal’s digital record came into the spotlight when North Korea hacked Sony in retaliation for producing “The Interview,” a slapstick comedy about journalists sent to assassinate that country’s supreme leader, Kim Jong-un. The hackers exposed thousands of internal emails, including Pascal’s ALL-CAPS-laced missives about celebrities and a racially charged joke about President Obama. This week, she announced she’ll be stepping down to join the “Spiderman” production team in May (and receive close to a $40 million production/parachute package over the next four years).
During cocktails before she took the stage, Brown said Pascal decided to speak publicly in San Francisco for the first time because “the timing was good. And in her home town, it’s a little too hot right now.”
After a dramatic video intro that featured footage of an explosion to indicate the hacking, Brown asked Pascal to recount the moment when she first realized that her emails would be exposed.
“I ran this company and I had to worry about everybody who was really scared. … People were really scared. … But nagging in the back of my mind, I kept calling [IT] and being like, ‘They don’t have our emails, tell me they don’t have our emails,'” she said. “But then they did. That was a bad moment. And you know what you write in emails.”
We know exactly what she writes in her emails.
Pascal — who dressed casually in clog heels and a leopard print wrap tied around her waist — said her off-the-cuff emails with Sony producer Scott Rudin were the result of a 30-year-relationship, an “ongoing fight” and playful “role-playing” since the day they met.
Brown brought up the Obama emails right away: “They accused you of being a racist,” she said.
“It was horrible. That was horrible,” Pascal said, tossing her hair and then brushing it out of her face, looking almost teary-eyed for a moment.
“As a woman, what I did was control how everybody felt about themselves and about me … and there was this horrible moment when I realized there was absolutely nothing I could do about whether I’d hurt people, whether I’d betrayed people,” she said. “I couldn’t protect anyone. … It was horrible because that’s how I did my job.”
She paused and then said something surprising.
“It was also strangely freeing,” she said, looking at Brown. “Because all of a sudden, that was just what it was.”
Pascal continued: “There is nothing you can do. You can’t say anything. You can’t explain anything. It’s just there.”
Brown mentioned that “The Interview” was actually a pretty bad movie (no “Citizen Kane,” she said). Pascal had a quick retort: “You don’t get to choose what you stand up for.”
Relationships had been less damaged than people outside Hollywood may think because it is a unique kind of town, Pascal said.
“Everybody understood because we all live in this weird thing called Hollywood,” she said. “If we all actually were nice, it wouldn’t work.”
For example, even though Rudin called Angelina Jolie a “minimally talented spoiled brat,” Pascal said: “Angie didn’t care.”
Was she surprised that the press were so harsh?
“I’m not supposed to say anything about that,” she said, looking out at the audience coyly. “But I will say that I was. People found reasons that going through my trash and printing it was an okay thing to do. They found a way to justify that. And they have to live with that.”
Among the leaks was detailed payment information that showed women were paid less than men: “I’ve paid [Jennifer Lawrence] a lot more money since then, I promise you. … Here’s the problem: I run a business. People want to work for less money, I pay them less money. … Women shouldn’t work for less money. They should know what they’re worth. Women shouldn’t take less. ‘Stop, you don’t need the job that bad.'”
She said she’s learned a lot from the hack about how to relate to people.
“You should always say exactly what you think directly to people all the time,” she said. “In the moment, the first time.”
Brown said this might be hard to do given how vulnerable Hollywood stars can be.
Pascal unleashed a little of the energy found in those emails.
“They’re bottomless pits of need. You’ve never seen anything like it,” she said, adding sarcastically: “They are so great. They’re this magical thing that no one else can be. They’re filled with the need to be loved … but that’s because they’re magical.”






thr

Amy Pascal Speaks Out About Getting "Fired" From Sony

2/11/2015 11:15pm PST



Amy Pascal is opening up about her departure from her Sony post.
Pascal, who is stepping down as Sony's co-chairman following the devastating hack on the studio, spoke to journalist Tina Brown at the Women in the World conference Wednesday in San Francisco, where she said she wasn't sure she belonged at the event
"All the women here are doing incredible things in this world — all I did was get fired," Pascal said, according to Recode. It should be noted that official statements about her departure from the Sony gig had implied a mutual parting of ways, rather than a firing.
"Everyone knows everything about me," Pascal continued. "What am I doing here?" Brown replied by saying, "None of us can imagine ..." and Pascal cut her off with, "No, you cannot."
Brown asked Pascal how she felt when she first realized her emails would be made public. "I ran this company, and I had to worry about everybody who was really scared … People were really scared … But nagging in the back of my mind, I kept calling [IT] and being like, ‘They don’t have our emails, tell me they don’t have our emails,' " she said. "But then they did. That was a bad moment. And you know what you write in emails."
When asked about being called a racist for her messages about Barack Obama, Pascal said: "It was horrible. That was horrible." Pascal and Scott Rudin had joked in an email chain about Obama's supposed taste in movies.

Some of Pascal's email threads were scrutinized for harsh words about her showbiz colleagues, particularly messages between Pascal and Rudin, but according to Pascal, that's the way the industry operates. "Everybody understood because we all live in this weird thing called Hollywood,” she said. “If we all actually were nice, it wouldn’t work." Pascal said that Angelina Jolie "didn't care" that Rudin referred to her in a leaked email as a "minimally talented spoiled brat."
However, Pascal criticized the press for reporting on the contents of her leaked messages. "People found reasons that going through my trash and printing it was an OK thing to do," said Pascal, who will work as a producer on several of Sony's biggest projects. "They found a way to justify that. And they have to live with that."

Brown asked about the revelation from leaked Sony documents that female stars such as Jennifer Lawrence earned less from the studio than their male counterparts. "I’ve paid [Jennifer Lawrence] a lot more money since then, I promise you," said Pascal. "Here’s the problem: I run a business. People want to work for less money, I pay them less money … Women shouldn't work for less money. They should know what they’re worth. Women shouldn’t take less. ‘Stop, you don’t need the job that bad.' "
As for what she has learned from the experience, Pascal said: "You should always say exactly what you think directly to people all the time." She added that this is hard to do with celebrities, as they are "bottomless pits of need."



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